Gerard Smyth – The Yellow River

Thursday 7 September 2017 – Sunday 29 October
Triskel Arts Centre, Cork

The Yellow River is a joint exhibition by painter Seán McSweeney and poet Gerard Smyth responding to The Yellow River area in Co. Meath which unites their personal histories.

The Yellow River is a tributary of the Blackwater (Kells), which joins the Boyne at Navan, County Meath that unites the personal histories of poet Gerard Smyth and artist Seán McSweeney. Gerard Smyth spent many summers in Meath staying with his grandmother and an aunt, whilst originally Seán McSweeney’s family lived in Clongill until the untimely death of his father.

Over the last two years Gerard Smyth has been revisiting Meath in further inquiry with Belinda Quirke, Director of Solstice, in the development of a new suite of poems, recollecting and revisiting significant sites of occurrence in the poet’s and county’s history. Seán McSweeney has created new work from recent trips to his original home place and the county. McSweeney here responds lyrically to particular sites of Smyth’s poetry, whilst also depicting in watercolour, ink, tempera and drawing, the particular hues of The Royal County.

A publication ‘The Yellow River’ accompanies the exhibition, on-sale at Triskel Arts Centre for €20 through Triskel Box Office.

The exhibition was curated by Belinda Quirke and Seán Mc Sweeney, originally for Solstice Arts Centre, Co Meath. The current exhibition is a re-curation for the Triskel Christchurch Space.

Kate Nolan : Lacuna

LACUNA is a new photographic and audio/visual installation evoking contemporary experiences in the border village of Pettigo, County Donegal. Flowing through the centre of the village the River Termon marks the physical border between County Donegal in the Republic of Ireland and County Fermanagh, in Northern Ireland.

Three bridges span the river – and at places where it narrows, often, without realising, you can step across into another country. LACUNA responds to the idea of the border as a ‘landless’ land or a cavity in understanding. Drawn to “in-between” places, artist Kate Nolan collaborated with the young people of Pettigo to explore the notion of the border as a place in flux. The exhibition weaves together still and moving images, recorded stories and a commissioned score by Gavin O’Brien to evoke the tangible and intangible, natural and constructed nature of the border. The diffusion of the physical border in recent years means that for young people there has been minimal impact on physical movement.

The prospect of the introduction of an international border between the EU and the UK with Brexit gives rise to new uncertainties about the future. Kate Nolan’s LACUNA project was supported by the Arts Council Visual Arts Bursary and made possible by the support of the people of Pettigo.

Anna O’Sullivan : The Way Things Go: An Homage

12 August – 15 October 2017
Butler Gallery, Kilkenny

The Butler Gallery, in association with Kilkenny Arts Festival, presents the influential film The Way Things Go (1987), by world-renowned Swiss artists Peter Fischli (b.1952) and David Weiss (1946-2012). This thirty-minute film was shot in a stark warehouse where automobile tires, garbage bags, and plastic water jugs take centre stage, rolling, twisting, and exploding in what seems to be an unstoppable chain of motion, both simple and complex. The film displays a forensic attention to detail, wherein Fischli and Weiss’s devotion to detritus injects a burst of humour into the seriousness of the art world.

In honour of the 30th anniversary of the making of The Way Things Go, a group of artists has been commissioned to make a new work in homage to this important film. These include Aideen Barry, Hannah Fitz, Atsushi Kaga, Nevan Lahart, Jonathan Mayhew and Caroline McCarthy. Also included is work by artists who have a particular sympathy with, or relationship to, The Way Things Go. These include works by Maggie Madden, Isabel Nolan and Liam O’Callaghan. All of these artists have acknowledged the importance and influence of the work of Fischli and Weiss on their individual art practice, and have created works in a variety of media that pays tribute to one of the truly inventive and memorable works of art produced in the late-twentieth century.

With thanks to the Arts Council for essential annual funding and to the OPW and the Department of Social Protection. Thanks are extended to the additional exhibition supporters: Kilkenny Arts Festival, Pro Helvetia the Swiss Arts Council, OPW and Kilkenny County Council Festival and Events Assistance Scheme 2017.

Bennie Reilly : Small Pieces of Precarious Life

1 September to 8 October 2017
Dunamaise Arts Centre, Church Street, Portlaoise, County Laois

Bennie Reilly presents Small Pieces of Precarious Life at Dunamaise Arts Centre, Church Street, Portlaoise,County Laois.
Working from an accumulation of collected objects and images, Bennie Reilly presents an exhibition of oil painting and sculptural bricolage.
Guiding a cacophony of shapes and tones into orbits, she orchestrates the noises of her collection into both dulcet and atonal forms.
The exhibition is influenced by the exotic, esoteric ‘cabinets of curiosity’ and the aspect of precariousness in nature and art.

William Hammond : Cork Folk Festival

Thursday, September 28th, 2017 to Sunday, October 1st, 2017

An annual event since 1979 the Cork Folk Festival brings a feast of folk events of all kinds to more than 40 venues around the city and county.
There is something for every taste and interest – from set to sean nós dancing, bluegrass to cajun music and singers clubs to singer songwriters. Many of the events are free. A pub trail map is available which allows you to skip from place to place and take in several acts in a single evening.

There is a strong focus on local styles of music, especially the traditional music of Sliabh Luachra and Cúil Aodha, regions of Co Cork famous for their distinctive playing and singing style.
The event opens each year with a big event in Grand Parade, with musicians, dancers and a crowd of up to 10000 people – the theme varies annually, but it will always be a real spectacle for sure.

Lynn Foster Fitzgerald and Émer O Laoghaire : Seeing comes before words

Sun 10 Sept – Fri 6 Oct
Court House Arts

Lynne Foster Fitzgerald

Lynne Foster Fitzgerald lives and works in Wicklow. Trained at IADTL and DIT (2006), her solo shows have addressed the possibility of psychological transformation through the act of painting.

In this collaboration Lynne’s love of and deep connection with materials is expressed through the recycling of studio detritus and found objects.

Émer O Laoghaire

Born in Dublin and living in Co. Wicklow for almost 20 years, Émer O Laoghaire started painting in 2014 using found materials such as discarded sails and household paints.

Émer has had no formal training apart from a workshop in NCAD on colour mixing. Now working on canvas and linen grounds and using acrylics and powdered pigments, Émer’s artwork reflects her interest in the dynamics of colour, the ongoing tension between light and dark, and the gradations of tone between the two.

Marie Hanlon : Lines Tell lies

9 September to 26 October 2017

The Source Arts Centre, Cathedral Street,Thurles, County Tipperary

In this exhibition Marie Hanlon presents small sculptures, wall works and a moving image piece. Lines Tell Lies initially attempts to persuade the viewer to accept realities which do not exist. Line is employed as a transforming and provocative element in works which are concerned with the act of seeing and ideas of perception.

The impetus for the exhibition came from a previous work called Cornerspace in which 39 still images of corners and items placed in corners are linked in an unfolding video montage. The slow-moving sequence mixes fictitious constructs made of studio props, with real places. The idea here was not not to fully disguise the fiction but rather to set in motion a dreamlike sequence of suggestion and association. Rhona Clarke’s electronic sounds for Cornerspace are devised to evoke texture, spatial illusion and mystery. Aural echoing and reverberation mirror the unfolding imagery as it seeks to transcend its limitations. What is suggested is sometimes more real than what is actually there.

The ideas, materials and props from Cornerspace became the starting point for the other pieces in the exhibition. Using glass, perspex, pencils, nails, staples etc. the works are concerned with skewing reality, distorting scale, proposing associations and so on. The viewer is asked to believe that air has solid form and that illusion has real substance. Reality blurs into fiction through means which are playful and intriguing; lines deceive the eye and all is not what it seems. An interval of time exists between the first moment of looking and the true realization of what is actually there. This short span allows a shift from looking to seeing, from seeing to perceiving.

Richard Proffitt : Written in Water, Shone in Stone, Lost in Light

August 10th – September 9th, 2017
Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Dublin

Opening reception; 6pm Thursday, 10th August

Written in Water, Shone in Stone, Lost in Light is comprised of work in various media – installation, painting, digital collage and audio, forming a constellation of thoughts and ideas that relate to perception and awareness. Richard Proffitt is interested in the transition between personally significant events and those that express aspects of a collective consciousness. In the written pieces that form part of Proffitt’s practice, he traces a process whereby thoughts and observations become recurring memories, replete with symbols and metaphorical meaning. Within his drawings, the natural world is transformed into a realm of psychedelic journey in which knots in the bark of a tree can take on a peculiar anthropomorphic appearance and mountains from afar can appear as towering deities.

There are numerous references to gateways, portals and paths, inferring a journey – a personal journey perhaps – or one towards expanding consciousness. In his installation particular materials are imbued with a certain power to act as potential talismans, esoteric objects that help to guide the way and to ward off evil. Proffitt’s work seeks out universally relatable symbols, ideas and attitudes which act as unifying forces within society. The audio aspect of the work forms an important part of the exhibition, encompassing elements of psychedelia, folk, drone and ambient music.

Proffitt considers symbols and allegories that cleave to the collective consciousness, he does this by referencing both myth and folk legends as well as their contemporary counterparts such as alien visitation and abduction narratives. This alludes to a phenomenon whereby popular culture is often assimilated and recounted as personal experience and vice-versa. Within Written in Water, Shone in Stone, Lost in Light, Proffitt works across a number of media, drawing on a wide variety of source material to create a body of work that considers the role of esoteric symbols in both personal and universal experience.

Written in Water, Shone in Stone, Lost in Light will be accompanied by a vinyl LP of 7 songs. The vinyl, titled Ending Time, will be available for purchase at the gallery; the limited edition features 180g vinyl, digital download code, poster, 12 page booklet featuring extra artwork alongside texts by Mary O’Halloran and Michael Hill and is limited to 50 copies. The regular edition features 180g vinyl and digital download code.

Seamus McCormack : Jealous Wall

Date: Friday 1st September – Sunday 15th October 2017
Luan Gallery, Athlone, Co. Westmeath

Luan Gallery is thrilled to announce its autumn 2017 exhibition entitled: Jealous Wall.

Curated by visual artist and curator Séamus McCormack, a London based Mullingar native, the exhibition features work by Miranda Blennerhassett, Niall de Buitléar, Janine Davidson, Adam Gibney and David Eager Maher.

The exhibition borrows its title from an architectural construction ‘The Jealous Wall’ which was built in the midlands of Ireland in Mullingar, Co. Westmeath, c.1760. Using concepts, ideas and themes that the structure, its history and form suggest, the exhibition brings together artists’ practices exploring the baroque, illusion, memory, site and architecture. It features a range of works in various media including installation, video, sculpture and drawing.

Curator, Séamus McCormack says:
‘The unique history behind ‘The Jealous Wall’ tells the sordid tale of a family squabble, in which Robert Rochfort, resentful of his brother, built the structure in order to conceal the view of his neighboring sibling’s dwelling. The construction became both a physical and metaphorical barrier between the two men and now remains a pertinent symbol and the source of inspiration for bringing the work of these artists together’.

Jealous Wall will launch on Friday 01st September at 6pm with a wine reception to which all are welcome and will continue until14th October 2017. Mayor of Athlone, Cllr Aengus ORourke will speak at the exhibition opening.

Luan Gallery is delighted to welcome schools and groups for talks and tours throughout the exhibition run. Guided tours are free of cost and available on request to all

Luan Gallery is open Tuesday – Saturday from 11.00 – 17.00 and Sundays 12.00 – 17.00. The gallery is closed on Mondays.

Sean Molloy : Simulations

31 Aug 2017 – 13 Oct 2017
Solstice Arts Centre, Railway Street, Navan, Meath

‘Simulations’, an exhibition of new paintings by Seán Molloy at Solstice Arts Centre, involves the construction of a series of capriccio-inspired landscape works that make tangential references to ancient topographical features associated with the county of Meath. While encompassing some of the more identifiable characteristics of this landscape (rich pastoral scenery, idyllic trees in full leaf, the picturesque remains of castles and follies), Molloy also introduces a set of anachronistic elements to these pictures that serve to both counteract and reinforce traditional approaches to documenting a sense of place. These elements take the form of features drawn from architectural archives, Dutch ‘Golden Age’ landscapes and over-painted abstract designs and optical devices.

The resulting oil paintings on canvas and panel are carefully considered compilations, amalgamations of landscapes half-remembered from the real world and various versions of it that exist in representational Western art. Curated by Sabina Mac Mahon, the exhibition is accompanied by two workshops in drawing and watercolour lead by Seán Molloy on Saturday 9 September 2017.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Seán Molloy studied at the University of Brighton and Glasgow School of Art before graduating from the National College of Art & Design, Dublin with a BA in Fine Art (Painting) in 2011 and an MFA in 2013. Recent exhibitions include Pallas Projects 20 Year Benefit Auction, City Assembly House, Dublin (2016); Neo Pentimenti, Ashford Gallery, RHA, Dublin; Disrupting Reality, Spectrum Artists’ Studios, Belfast (2015); and the RHA Annual Exhibition (2013-17). Molloy’s work is included in the collections of Fingal County Council, de Blacam & Meagher Architects, AXA Insurance and the State Art / OPW Collection. He lives and works in Dublin. seanmolloy.ie

Cliona Harmey : BEAUFORT ( “about the weather” )

25 August to 13 October 2017
Solstice Arts Centre, Railway Street, Navan, Co. Meath

In this exhibition Cliona Harmey presents a number of archival works which engage with weather and atmosphere, all of which were made and stored using recent but now almost legacy/obsolete technologies.

BEAUFORT ( “about the weather” ) takes the legacy of Sir Francis Beaufort as an initial prompt. Born in Navan in 1774, Beaufort is most famous for the development of the eponymous Beaufort Scale, used to measure wind speed by observing the visual effects of wind on other elements such as the surface of water, the smoke of a chimney, the movement of trees or people.

David Quinn : White line series

31 Aug 2017 – 13 Oct 2017
Solstice Arts Centre

Solstice Arts Centre is delighted to present white line series, an exhibition of new paintings by Wicklow-based artist David Quinn. The white line series is an exploration of line, space and surface. The lines are incised with an oil pencil or cutting tool into carefully prepared surfaces. Quinn used a ruler to make the lines, so any deviation or variation in the line is a result of the uneven support or his unsteady hand. The pieces that feature in this exhibition are purely abstract in that they are not paintings of something else, nor are they metaphors or exercises in self-expression.

Curated by Sabina Mac Mahon, the exhibition is accompanied by an In Conversation event with David Quinn and editor, critic and broadcaster Niall MacMonagle, who will talk to David about his recent work and painting process. Saturday 7 October 2017, 2pm. Admission free, no booking required.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
David Quinn studied Visual Communications at DIT Mountjoy Square from 1989 to 1993 and has exhibited regularly since 1995. Recent exhibitions include Start Art Fair, Saatchi Gallery, London with Gibbons & Nicholas; blank, Fenderesky Gallery, Belfast (2016); seam (2015) and dunkelbunt (2014), Taylor Galleries, Dublin; and group shows Small, Purdy Hicks Gallery, London (2017) and two birds / one stone, Farmleigh Gallery, Dublin (2016). Public collections include Bank of Ireland; Hôtel de Crillon, Paris; Electric Ireland; OPW / State Art Collection; AIB Corporate Banking; Eaton Corporation; and the Morrison Hotel. Quinn lives and works in Co. Wicklow.

Richard Proffitt : Written in Water, Shone in Stone, Lost in Light

August 10th – September 9th, 2017
Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Dublin

Opening reception; 6pm Thursday, 10th August

Written in Water, Shone in Stone, Lost in Light is comprised of work in various media – installation, painting, digital collage and audio, forming a constellation of thoughts and ideas that relate to perception and awareness. Richard Proffitt is interested in the transition between personally significant events and those that express aspects of a collective consciousness. In the written pieces that form part of Proffitt’s practice, he traces a process whereby thoughts and observations become recurring memories, replete with symbols and metaphorical meaning. Within his drawings, the natural world is transformed into a realm of psychedelic journey in which knots in the bark of a tree can take on a peculiar anthropomorphic appearance and mountains from afar can appear as towering deities.

There are numerous references to gateways, portals and paths, inferring a journey – a personal journey perhaps – or one towards expanding consciousness. In his installation particular materials are imbued with a certain power to act as potential talismans, esoteric objects that help to guide the way and to ward off evil. Proffitt’s work seeks out universally relatable symbols, ideas and attitudes which act as unifying forces within society. The audio aspect of the work forms an important part of the exhibition, encompassing elements of psychedelia, folk, drone and ambient music.

Proffitt considers symbols and allegories that cleave to the collective consciousness, he does this by referencing both myth and folk legends as well as their contemporary counterparts such as alien visitation and abduction narratives. This alludes to a phenomenon whereby popular culture is often assimilated and recounted as personal experience and vice-versa. Within Written in Water, Shone in Stone, Lost in Light, Proffitt works across a number of media, drawing on a wide variety of source material to create a body of work that considers the role of esoteric symbols in both personal and universal experience.

Written in Water, Shone in Stone, Lost in Light will be accompanied by a vinyl LP of 7 songs. The vinyl, titled Ending Time, will be available for purchase at the gallery; the limited edition features 180g vinyl, digital download code, poster, 12 page booklet featuring extra artwork alongside texts by Mary O’Halloran and Michael Hill and is limited to 50 copies. The regular edition features 180g vinyl and digital download code.

Clary Mastenbroek : The Dutch Connection | Group Show at Fairbrook House, Co. Waterford

5 May to 15 September 2017
Fairbrook House Gardens + Museum of Contemporary Figurative Art, Kilmeaden, Co.Waterford.

The Dutch Connection shows Paintings, water colour, objects by Wout Muller, oil paintings by Tamara Muller and prints, pastels and oil paintings of Clary Mastenbroek. An exhibition of unique magic realistic and contemporary art. The artists have been exhibiting world wide with their art in museum and private collections.

Open: Wednesday to Sunday, 10am to 4pm

Ben Hennesey : Maine, Evie, Mary and Grace – The Women Who Led the Modern Movement in Irish Art

Exhibition runs from June 29th – September 30th 2017
Greyfriars Municipal Art Gallery, Greyfriars Street,Waterford.

Greyfriars Municipal Art Gallery major summer exhibition “MAINIE, EVIE, MARY AND GRACE – The Women Who Led the Modern Movement in Irish Art”

Curated by artist Ben Hennessy, this exhibition tells the story of how, during the first half of the 20th century, the modern art movement in Ireland was forged largely through the work and ongoing influence of prominent Irish women artists.

Featuring artworks by Mainie Jellett (1897 – 1944), Evie Hone (1894 – 1955), Mary Swanzy (1882 – 1978), Grace Henry (1868 – 1953), Letitia Hamilton (1878 – 1964), Norah McGuinness (1903 – 1980) and others.

Tom Cuffe : Kiki Origami Festival

26 August – 3 September
Portlaoise, Portlaoise, County Laois, Ireland

The Kiki Theatre & Performance Group are proud to present
The Kiki Origami Festival! The festival will run from Saturday, August 26th until Sunday, September 3rd.

This is a great event, not to be missed. We’ll have something for everyone, for people of all ages and abilities.

Hazel Egan : High tide

25 July – 27 August 2017

Dunamaise Arts Centre
Co. Laois

High Tide’ is an exhibition in response to climate change and global instability.
Due to pollution and the excessive burning of fossil fuels, the natural balance of everyday life is disrupted as ice caps melt and sea levels rise. ‘The damaging effects on the environment are becoming more and more extreme. Egan’s practice draws on the threat of drastic change and the anxiety of an uncertain future.

Caroline Pi : Shrine for girls

June 16 – August 20 2017
The LAB Gallery, Dublin

The LAB Gallery is pleased to present, Shrine For Girls, Dublin, the first solo exhibition in Ireland of New York artist Patricia Croinin. One of the critically acclaimed highlights of the 2015 Venice Biennale, this site-specific installation is a meditation on the global plight of exploited girls and women.

Moving from the sacred altars and architecture of Venice’s sixteenth-century Chiesa di San Gallo to the secular urban gallery context of The LAB, in the heart of Joyce’s Nighttown and built in the shadow of the last Magdalene Laundry to close in Ireland in 1996, Cronin gathers hundreds of articles of women’s and girls’ clothing from around the world to represent three specific tragedies. Brightly-colored saris symbolize two Indian cousins who were gang-raped and lynched in 2014; somber hijabs signify 276 Nigerian Chibok schoolgirls who were kidnapped by the terrorist group Boko Haram in 2014 (109 of which are still missing); and pale aprons symbolize those worn by “fallen women” in forced labour at the Magdalene Asylums and Laundries in Ireland, the United Kingdom, Europe and the United States to act as relics of these young martyrs.

Shrines, part of every major religion’s practice, provide a space for contemplation, petition and rituals of remembrance. In this exhibition, Cronin presents the three original fabric sculptures, here piled on top of their shipping crates to also address human trafficking and act as a metaphor of who or what is valued in our culture. Returning to the neighbourhood where the weight of history inevitably overlays the interpretation of the contemporary, in the historic Monto, Cronin reminds us that we are all complicit in allowing violent abuses of women’s rights to become invisible in our society. The histories of the Magdalene Laundries are only starting to be heard.

Small photographs of each tragedy accompany the sculpture and a new series of oil portrait paintings, exhibitied for the first time, place a human face on tragedy and draw our attention away from statistics to the magnitude of the individual loss and unrealized human potential.

Cronin asks: “What is the role of contemporary art in our 24-hour news cycle society? What can an artist do if they are not a politician, an NGO nor a philanthropist? Hopefully the artist looks out, keenly observes the world, reflects, and responds in a way that shakes us out of our numbness. We cannot be silent.”

Naomi O’Nolan : Jack B Yeats and Paul Henry, Contrasting Visions of Ireland

2 June to 30 September 2017
The Hunt Museum, The Custom House, Rutland Street, Limerick

This summer we are featuring two of Ireland’s most important 20th century artists, Jack B. Yeats + Paul Henry, in the exhibition Contrasting Visions of Ireland from June to September. Billed to be an exhibition of both national and international significance and will feature 50 works, many of which are not usually on public display. This brings together a collection drawn from private and public collections including works from the European Investment Bank Collection in Luxembourg.

Helen Gaynor : And Creatures Dream a New Language

3 July to 25 August
Wexford Arts Centre and Wexford County Council Buildings

The Arts Department of Wexford County Council in partnership with Wexford Arts Centre are delighted to present And Creatures Dream…A New Language, a group exhibition which reveals in part how the visual arts are represented in County Wexford, with focus in this exhibition, on painting. The selected artists involved actively engage with the language of paint, wholeheartedly referencing its distinguished history, while making adventurous forays beyond.

The artists included in the exhibition are Robert Armstrong, David Begley, John Busher, Ciaran Bowen, Eamonn Carter, Serena Caulfield, Helen Gaynor, Aileen Murphy, Kate Murphy, Rosie O’Gorman, Breda Stacey, Emma Roche, George Warren and Michael Warren.

Lisa Byrne : Kustom Kulture

24 June to 11 August
The Presentation Centre
Convent Road,Enniscorthy, Co.Wexford

This unique exhibition of Kustom Kulture artwork is a prime example of blurring creative boundaries. Ger utilises unusual objects and creates fantastic one off pieces based on a niche market with roots in American Rock and Roll. The Official Open night will feature a host of all things kustom including cars and bikes along with Ger’s original artwork.